Day 4

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Paper title Combining in situ measurements with ground based, space- and airborne reflectance measurements to investigate signal transport along river-connected lake systems
Authors
  1. Sabine Wollrab Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) Speaker
  2. Stella A. Berger Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB)
  3. Jens Nejstgaard Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB)
  4. Hans-Peter Grossart Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB)
  5. Franz Hölker Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB)
  6. Andreas Jechow Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB)
  7. Christine Kiel Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB)
  8. Katrin Kohnert Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB)
  9. Igor Ogashawara Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB)
  10. Gabriel Singer University of Innsbruck
  11. Jürgen Fischer Freie Universität Berlin (FUB)
  12. Thomas Ruhtz Freie Unversität Berlin
  13. Peter Gege German Aerospace Center (DLR)
  14. Stefan Plattner German Aerospace Center (DLR), Remote Sensing Technology Institute
  15. Torsten Sachs Helmholtz Centre Potsdam, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences
  16. Gunnar Lischeid Leibniz-Centre for Agricultural Research (ZALF)
  17. Rüdiger Röttgers Helmholz Zentrum Hereon
  18. Martin Hieronymi Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon
  19. Thomas Schneider Technical University of Munich (TUM)
Form of presentation Poster
Topics
  • A7. Hydrology and Water Cycle
    • A7.06 EO for monitoring water quality and ecological status in inland waters
Abstract text Worldwide freshwater systems are impacted by climate warming and anthropogenic forcing, influencing water level and runoff regimes via changes in precipitation and landuse patterns. Especially for river-connected lake systems these rapid changes might have far reaching consequences where inland nutrient loading might accumulate along the river system and finally lead to destabilization of distant ecosystems like estuaries. Thereby lakes, through their influence on flow regime, might play a critical role in how much and how far local eutrophication events will be transported along the river network. Currently, studies on river-connected lake systems are scarce and largely based on data with both low temporal and spatial resolution. Furthermore existing meta-ecosystem theory rarely takes lake-to-lake connectivity into account. In this study, we modeled how local nutrient input influences phytoplankton and how both propagate along strong or weak connected lakes. These theoretical investigations were accompanied by an extensive field study on lakes located along the Upper Havel-river system in Northern Germany including shallow and deep lakes and covering various flow regimes. We investigated effects of local nutrient loading on regional-scale plankton development along river-connected lake chains. To achieve high temporal and spatial resolution, we measured water constituents combining automated in-situ probes with ground-based, space- and airborne reflectance measurements. The field data show that upstream nutrient input drove phytoplankton development along the entire lake chain due to tight hydrological linkage. Our results suggest that similar point sources can result in profoundly different maximum intensity, spatial range and regional-scale magnitude of eutrophication impacts in lake chains dependent on flow regime and lake characteristics. We highlight the potential of combining in-situ measurements with remote sensing to improve lake meta-ecosystems monitoring.